Doughface

The term doughface originally referred to an actual mask made of dough, but came to be used in a disparaging context for someone, especially a politician, who is perceived to be pliable and moldable. In the 1847 Webster’s dictionary doughfacism was defined as “the willingness to be led about by one of stronger mind and will.” In the years leading up to the American Civil War, “doughface” was used to describe Northerners who favored the Southern position in political disputes. Typically it was applied to a Northern Democrat who was more often allied with the Southern Democrats than with the majority of Northern Democrats.

南部の奴隷制に反対しなかった北部州選出の連邦議会議員のこと。

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